Tuesday, August 30, 2005

Globalization Archive

Online Resources

"Globalization" and "Neoliberalism"[PDF]
Discussion by Berkley economist Brad DeLong of critiques of globalization.

Unofficial Paul Krugman Archive: Global
Unofficial Paul Krugman Archive: International Trade
Articles mostly from the 1990s.

Globalization FAQ.
Survey of issues surrounding global economic development, emphasizing challenges to emerging markets.

IMF(International Monetary Fund)
OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development)
Penn World Tables
Country by country comparisons.
World Bank
BIS (Bank for International Settlements)
The "central bank of central banks."
Wikipedia:Globalization
Commanding Heights
Website of the PBS broadcast.
Far Eastern Economic Review
Institute for International Economics
Project Syndicate


Debate Chronology

1991

12/12
Summers Memo
Controversial World Bank memo allegedly encouraging polluters to relocate to less developed nations.

1998

11/2
The Global Fix
In The New Republic, economist Dani Rodrik formulates a plan to save the world.
12/18
Please DON"T Save Me Kathie Lee!
Suite101 discussion.

1999

4/26
Criticisms of the Index of Economic Freedom
Mike Huben compiles criticism of the right-wing Heritage Foundation’s propaganda initiative pertaining to the level of governmental intervention in emerging markets.

2000

5/1
The Meltzer Report
Brad DeLong on a major critique of the IMF.

2002

1/1

How to Judge Globalism.
In the American Prospect, Economist Amartya Sen deals with the promises and perils of globalism.
Globalism’s Discontents.
Economist Joseph E. Stiglitz, writing in the American Prospect, critiques the IMF’s one-size-fits-all policies.
9/4
Globalization Will Continue
Brad DeLong links to Martin Wolf in the Financial Times.

2003

9/4
Brink Lindsey Is Very Good Indeed
Brad DeLong on Brink Lindsey's book, Against the Dead Hand.

2004

9/9
Paul Samuelson's outsourcing "bombshell"
Daniel Drezner links to New York Times coverage.
9/9
Globalization, slow down!
Christian Science Monitor reporting on the Samuelson paper.
9/27
On Point: Paul Samuelson: Rethinking Free Trade
Radio interview.
12/6
Shaking Up Trade Theory
BusinessWeek coverage of recent events.
12/7
Shaking Up Trade Theory
Aftermath on the blog Dvorak Uncensored.

2005

9/15
BUSH AND THE MILLENNIUM....
Kevin Drum of Washington Monthly decries Bush's description of his stewardship of "millenium" goals.
10/17
Paul Krugman: The Big Squeeze
Discussing a Paul Krugman column, economist Mark Thoma offers education as a main response to the pressures of outsourcing.
10/19
The Future of American Manufacturing
Mark Thoma discusses a column by Robert Samuelson of the Washington Post.
10/20
Dallas Fed President Fisher: Cost-Pull Disinflation from Globalization
Fisher's views presented by Mark Thoma.
New York Fed President Geithner on Global Imbalances
Mark Thoma continues his series of globalization posts at his blog, Economist's View.
11/9
Progressives should be for progress
Economist Alan Blinder at TPMCafe:
People sometimes forget that international trade is just one of many forces that are changing the world--and certainly not the most important one. No one doubts, for example, that technology is more powerful, more pervasive, and more disruptive than trade. The microchip has probably displaced more American workers than China ever will. But whether driven by trade, technology, or something else, economic change typically has casualties; and we ought to have robust policies and institutions to help people over the rough spots. I think both pro- and anti-trade progressives can agree on that.

What's the alternative? We could to stop economic change--or rather to try to stop it, for such efforts almost always fail. But that is surely not the route to progress. With sufficiently rigorous (and ridiculous) policies, the U.S. could have preserved the industrial structure of the 1950s, a time when super-America was super-dominant on the world stage and international trade was a vastly smaller share of our GDP, right to the present day. In this counterfactual experiment, GM and US Steel would be bigger companies today, while Microsoft and eBay would be based in some other countries. But at what cost to U.S. standards of living? And do we really think this would have saved the jobs of all those auto and steelworkers? It has long been a mystery to economists why so many people view creative destruction that stems from technology as okay, while similar creative destruction that stems from international trade is something to be opposed.
2016

5/11
Should the Middle Class Fear the World's Poor? 
Discussion of outcomes of developed world middle classes vs developing world lower classes in the wake of Branko Milanovic's new book on global inequality.
5/18
Worlds of Inequality
Miles Corak reviews Milanovic's new book in the American Prospect.

2017

6/9
What's Wrong With Our System of Global Trade And Finance
John Judis interviews Dani Rodrik at Talking Points Memo.

7/1
The New Class War
Michael Lind, in American Affairs, on neoliberal globalization as class war.

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